Tag Archives: pattern

Zweigelt

Here’s something I haven’t done in a loooong while! It’s a new design! These fingerless mitts are called Zweigelt after a wine variety of grape (and because I didn’t have ANY patterns with a “Z” name yet!) As always the design is available through Ravelry.

Zweigelt preview

These are fairly simple mitts. Undulating cables sprout from the ribbed cuff, decorating a cozy pair of winter weight mitts. They’re knit simply from wrist to fingers and they work up quickly in aran weight yarn to and keep the focus on the rhythmic cables.

woman drinking coffee wearing fingerless mitts

The yarn is the incomparable Merino Aran from Periwinkle Sheep. This colorway is called “Any Port in a Storm” (see the wine reference?) but you really can’t go wrong with any of Karin’s colors. They’re all simply amazing! This yarn is wonderfully soft, as you’d expect from merino. But I will add that I’ve been wearing these mitts regularly (ahem, for 2.5 years) and they aren’t pilled. No pilling at all with a 100% merino is amazing!

two fingerless mitts

So yeah, like I just said, these mitts have been finished for a looong time. Luckily I had the forethought to photograph them when they were new. Because it’s taken me quite a while to get the pattern written and laid out. I actually have a lot of designs that were photographed 2+ years ago. Hopefully I’ll get a couple more of them released this year!

woman looking thoughtfully at coffee mug wearing fingerless mitts

If you’ve been paying any attention at this blog you’ll notice a couple things about these photos. My hair isn’t that long any more, it’s also not exactly that color. And I have new glasses. If you follow the Ravelry link at the top you’ll notice another thing has changed: my name. I’m living, and designing as, Becky Wilkins now. It’s the culmination of a different long process, one which certainly had an impact on my ability to design. I’ve been a single mom for over a year already, so this divorce is just putting on paper the truth that I’ve already been living.

Cast Iron, Cast On

Over the weekend I re-released my book! Cast Iron, Cast On was originally published through Cooperative Press. But in 2017 the rights reverted back to Calley and myself, and the book went out of print.

book cover with woman carrying basket of apples

My plan was to make it available again ASAP. But of course life has other ideas. My computer died. And while CP had sent us all the layout files I had no way to edit them without a full computer. And getting the replacement took a back seat to having a baby and dealing with a whole lot of life changes. I finally got my new computer last spring (with the help of a good friend and a pattern sale) and then I needed to find the time to update the layout.

layout in progress

I needed to change the body font, and that meant I needed to put my eyes on every page, check the text box cutoffs, the white space, the overlaps. Everything. It was a much bigger project than I expected. Since I was in there checking the pattern page by page I also updated all errata and other known mistakes. But finally it is done!

You can purchase the whole book as a PDF on Ravelry (link and button above).

An equally exciting second announcement is that the individual knitting patterns are now available as well! If you just want one design you can purchase that through its Ravelry page.

Please be aware that these PDFs are created straight from the book. The most noticeable result will be the page numbers (each single PDF still has the footer information from the full book). Each single PDF stands alone and will contain all directions, photos, charts, keys, and abbreviations you’ll need. It will not include any of the corresponding recipes.

I hope you enjoy these, there’s been a lot going on behind the scenes to get them released!

Good news, bad news, good news

To start, here’s the very important good news: I’m having a pattern sale! This is a good one: buy one, get one free! Just put “upgradetime” in the coupon code box of your Ravelry cart.

sale time

 

 

So what’s the bad news? The rights have reverted from the publisher back to me on my book. This means Cast Iron, Cast On is currently out of print. And to make matters worse, my computer died.

Wait, why are these two things related? Because I can’t release the ebook back onto Ravelry, or make single PDFs available, until I get a new computer. So, that’s what the sale is all about. I need to fund this new computer. So buy patterns! Spread the word!

The final good news is that I have FIVE new designs that have been knit and photographed. Once I have my new computer I can get rolling on the layout and you should be seeing some brand new patterns from me this year! And I do plan on releasing all those book patterns in single PDF format as well. So 2018 should be a fun one, designwise. If I can just get past this broken-computer-hump.

Sale details:
The sale applies to any of the patterns in my store – including the ebooks. (It will always be the less expensive pattern that is free.) You can use the code more than once – but you’ll need to check out more than once. If you put four patterns in your cart at the same time the system will only give you one free. The sale runs from today through March 8th.

Thanks for sticking around!

 

Essex Junction

Ah…. Fall. Sweater dress weather.

Essex Junction hero

This is Essex Junction, my newest pattern – my contribution to the All Aboard! collection released just in time for Rhinebeck. As always, please favorite and queue it on Ravelry.

This one has been a long time coming! It was last february that a bunch of us designers decided to release a collection of sweater dresses. I knew then I wanted something with a color work yoke. I knew by April it was going to be another take on the modified raglan shape I used in Stammel. And I’ve been itching to do some serious corrugated ribbing for about that long too.

essex junction hems

Sourcing the yarn took a bit longer. I knew I wanted worsted or aran weight yarn. I knew I wanted either a variegated yarn, or a whole lot of solid colors. I considered a lot of brands but couldn’t find anything that really fit the bill until I asked twitter. That’s when Laura from The Unique Sheep let me know they dye their gradience sets in heavier weight yarns. Perfect.

This dress uses a semi-solid for the body (the Dove colorway) and a gradience set for the CC’s (Black Daylilly) which means just those two colorways provide all the colors in this dress. If you’re subbing yarns in you’ll need approximately equal amounts of at least four different colors for the chart.

essex junction shoulder

Once I had the yarn in hand the design came quickly and easily. I swatched and researched my little sleeve peeries. Some complicated math came into play to figure out how to make that chart fit the yoke in all sizes. But the knitting went quickly. I don’t remember much frogging at all… In spite of the long sleeves I think you’ll find this a quick knit!

essex junction back

The collection, All Aboard! Features six dresses from six different designers. I love them all and wish I had time to actually knit them all… If you’re a sweater dress person too – consider the collection, it’s an amazing deal!

All Aboard cover

Morning Walk KAL

Happy September! I’m beyond thrilled to let you all know I’ve published a new pattern, you’ve seen peaks before, but here’s Morning Walk, please favorite and queue at will!

morning_walk_preview

 

Even better, I’m hosting a Fall Sweater Challenge knit along in cooperation with Blue Moon Fiber Arts: the folks who dye the gorgeous targhee wool I used for this design.

side close

From now to mid-september the pattern is 25% off, and everyone who purchases gets a code good for 10% off targhee worsted from BMFA’s website. I want to send a huge thanks out to them for supporting my design! I hope you check out their yarn. It’s put up in hanks of over 600 yards each. For this cap-sleeved cardi you need just one or two skeins to knit the whole thing.

As with all my designs this sweater is graded for a wide range of sizes:
27 (30.5, 34.75, 38.25, 42.5, 46, 49.5, 54.5, 58, 62.25)”/ 68.5 (77.5, 88.5, 97, 108, 117, 125.5, 138.5, 147.5, 158) cm.

I can’t tell you how excited I was (when I finished the math) to see that even the largest sizes would only need two skeins of yarn. The targhee wool is soft, lofty, and bouncy which makes it just perfect for showing off the leaf lace pattern in this design. It lends stretch and resiliency to the seed stitch border as well.

back open

I hope to see your sweater in our knit-along group soon!

Winnimere

Hello, hello, how are you? Welcome back! Would you like to see my new hat? Of course you would!

winnimere details

Meet Winnimere! (queue and favorite on Ravelry, as always.) She’s knit out of Anzula’s new yarn: Ava. It’s a classic MCN (merino, cashmere, nylon – in case you missed that abbreviation until today) except in sport weight! The yarn is highly plied to give good stitch definition and great bounciness. Perfect for stranded color work.

winnimere side back

I had a lot of trouble choosing a color for this hat. I designed this hat to use a dark and light shade of the same color, the sample is worked up in light purple on dark (Irene & Grape). But Anzula has SO MANY COLORS (over 100!!) I think it’d be great to have a red version (Madam & Mauve), a blue one (Storm & Seafoam), green possibly (Spruce & Nimbus). So many options!

winnimere profile

The sample went to TNNA back at the start of June and is hanging out with Anzula now. I kinda love the idea of my design traveling around with them, seeing sights and meeting far more knitters than I will, personally. The pattern will be available through Anzula as well as Ravelry and anywhere Stitch Sprout patterns are sold!

winnimere morning

Winnimere is a warm and loose fitted hat showing off stranded stitch patterns. It features a Latvian braid and corrugated ribbing brim followed by a simple, flecked colorwork pattern which fades to dark before the decreases form the gathered, slouchy crown. This hat is meant to be worn loose and is shown in Large with 1” positive ease.

Summit vest

Hot off the press!* We have the summer 2016 issue of Interweave Knits: and I’m in it! I’m psyched to see my Summit Vest is in good company (check it out On Ravelry, where you can favorite and queue it as always)

interweave knits

When I saw the summer call included a theme for “mountain house” I just knew I had to submit. An entire story line in a summer issue about living in the mountains and needing a sweater once in a while? Sign. Me. Up. Working with the new editor, Meghan, was a pleasure and I love her eye for details. This issue is cohesive and beautiful.

interweave knits

I love this vest (easy for me to say). The cable and lace pattern is one that I’ve wanted to use in a garment forever. Integrating the ribbing with the chart took a bit of tweaking. So when you cast on follow those setup rows carefully. But once the ribbing is established it flows naturally into the charts and the body of the garment.

interweave knits

The body of the sweater switches to stockinette while the charts continue up the front and the ribbing continues at the sides to provide some stretchy fitting to the garment. The pattern keeps on going right up the hood and meets at the very crown of the head.

cable close up

This is not my first time designing with Imperial Yarns and I love their Columbia base every time I work with it. You all know I love single source yarns and sustainable family farms. This yarn is also woolly, bouncy, but still soft and squeezable. I highly recommend it!

*well, sort of – the print magazines won’t even be on the news stands until the 16th! But the patterns and the electronic version are on Interweave’s site already. Isn’t living in the future fun?

Meristem

Remember waaay back in August when I was knitting a second of my Meristem pattern? I probably finished the knitting in September? I don’t remember exactly. I even got the ends woven in. But then is sat. And sat and sat and sat. I really don’t know why it sat for MONTHS waiting for me to sew the shoulder seams. When I finally got around to it, it took about 10 minutes.

meristem yoke

Rather crazily, over those months, I dropped a garment size. And I’d been knitting this vest with positive ease already. What to do? Instead of giving up on it, I decided to block the crap out of it and see what I could do. Instead of blocking it flat I blocked it by hanging it upside down – the goal was to stretch out the body. Essentially I blocked it to throw the row to stitch ratio all off and make the garment longer and narrower.

meristem side

And it worked! Well, pretty much. This vest is still a bit loose at the edges. Mostly the underarms, but honestly also the garter stitch hem is mis-sized compared to the body now.

meristem whole

Not too much, but if you’re looking you can see it.

Luckily somewhere over the fall I decided I needed more sweater dresses. So adding this one to my collection is a pleasant surprise.

meristem back

The biggest problem is the static. The trim is handspun, but the body is silky wool – and apparently this fiber blend is static-prone? I didn’t know, until now. And the dress could probably benefit a LOT from a slip (especially over my microfiber leggings) except that my slip is too long.

meristem perched

But still, I finished this weeks ago. But it was late fall, or early winter, and I couldn’t take photos because it was dark. Until this week I finally took my camera with me to work. And the remote, the sweater dress, and I, we had a little photo shoot in the freezing fog.

meristem fog

I’m so glad to finally be able to share! Obviously, there have been some (ahem) changes to the pattern. The two color yoke is the biggest, and I love it. The length is different, but if I were doing this again I’d actually add rows, not just block it all wonky. Details, detail…

Kinsman

I’ve got a quick new pattern to tell you about today! Meet Kinsman. (please queue and favorite on Ravelry!)

Kinsman hero

These boot toppers are kinda addictive. You know that feeling when you’re cold and you simply MUST knit something warm? We all know it’s illogical. Putting on an existing sweater would be a faster way to warm up.

kinsman closeup

Well these little boot toppers are so quick you really can cast on, and have something warm to wear almost instantly. Knit out of Fleece Artist BFL Aran on size 8 needles this project goes quickly. And at 110 or 180 yards you probably have some extra aran weight yarn kicking around in your stash that could be kicking around on your boots keeping you warm instead.

kinsman kneeling

I hope you’ll give them a try! They’re stylish AND cozy. There’s lace work on every round to give the edging that scalloped look. But it is only 2-4 rounds at a time so it’s never really tricky to keep track of what you’re doing.

kinsman dance

Winnie’s Vest

After a bit of an unexpected hiatus I’m super-excited to share Winnie’s Vest with you all!

winnie hood

The pattern is available in sizes ranging from newborn to childs’ size 8! Windsor is wearing the 12 month size in these photos, but she’s still wearing the vest now, at 21 months. Vests are a versatile children’s garment.

You can find the pattern details and yarn requirements on ravelry. The PDF is available there, or right here:

winnie preview

This vest is knit up in knitpicks wool of the andes – the superwash version. I don’t often work with superwash, but I bought this yarn specifically to make this vest and I have to say it’s pretty amazing stuff. She wore this vest all winter long, still wears it on cool summer days, and it still looks pretty much brand new. Well, it would if I blocked it once in awhile… But what I’m trying to say is the fabric hasn’t pilled at all, and holding up to the rough and tumble play of a toddler is EXACTLY what I needed from this yarn.

winnie back

Seriously, I don’t mind handwashing her stuff, but when it wears out unexpectedly fast I get sad…

What can I say about this vest? I started the project almost a year ago, back in August. Windsor was still just a crawling baby then and I wasn’t getting a lot of knitting time. It went into hibernation a couple of times and I finally finished it in December but didn’t want her to wear it until we’d had our photo shoot. Which didn’t happen until February. But after that she loved it, she’d actually dig it out of her bin of clothes and ask to wear the “sweawer” (that’s toddler-speak for sweater).

Winnie hero